Bainbridge Island Market Stats YTD July 14, 2013

Statistics Year-To-Date
July 14, 2013

Residential Units on the Market: 122 Active Listings, down from 139 in May. Up from 88 (just above historic lows) on March 15, down from 245 on September 27, 2011.





Condos
on the Market: 45 Active Listings, up from 37 in May.


Vacant Parcels on the Market: 58 Active Listings. This number has remained stable all year.
Closed Residential Sales Year-to-Date 2013: 221

Closed Residential Sales for Same Period 2012: 190 representing an 8% increase in sales

Homes Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 77 average for the past two years

Closed Condo Sales Year-to-Date 2013: 45

Closed Condo Sales for Same Period 2012: 35

Condos Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 17

Sold Vacant Land Year-to-Date: 45

Closed Vacant Land Sales for Same Period 2012 35
Vacant Land Currently Under Contract 17

Sold Vacant Land all of 2005: 69

Residential Sales: 2005 – 2011 – Median Price and Average Days on Market
2012… 386 $524,650 average days on market 100

2011… 257 $493,000 average days on market 155

2010… 255 $540,000 average days on market 132

2009… 212 $546,000 average days on market 198

2008… 186 $589,000 average days on market 161

2007… 331 $680,000 average days on market 98

2006… 350 $673,750 average days on market 98

2005… 397 $650,000 average days on market 91


Breakdown of Residential and Pending Sales Year-to-Date
000 to 100 thousand Sold…1 Pending…0
101 to 200 Sold…3 Pending…3
201 to 300 Sold.. 16 Pending…9
301 to 400 Sold…39 Pending…6

401 to 500 Sold…49 Pending…18

501 to 600 Sold…30 Pending…14
601 to 700 Sold…26 Pending…7
701 to 800 Sold…18 Pending…8
801 to 900 Sold…13 Pending…2

901 to 1Mil Sold…5 Pending…2

1.0 to 1.2Mil Sold…6 Pending…3

1.2 to 1.4Mil Sold…5 Pending…2

1.4 to 1.6Mil Sold…2 Pending…3

1.6 to 1.8Mil Sold…1 Pending…0

1.8 to 2.0Mil Sold…1 Pending…0


2.0 to 2.5Mil Sold…2 Pending…0













2.5 Million + Sold…0 Pending…0

Days on Market
Single Family Homes

TrendGraphix
Curnt vs. Prev Month: Avg CDOM 57.1% | Sold/Orig LP Diff. % 1.1%
Curnt vs. Same Month 1 Yr Ago: Avg CDOM -25% | Sold/Orig LP Diff. % 6.7%
Single Family Homes

TrendGraphix
Curnt vs. Prev Month: Months of Inventory (Closed Sales) -23.9%
Curnt vs. Same Month 1 Yr Ago: Months of Inventory (Closed Sales) -37.7%


Bainbridge Island Museum of Art Seattle Mag Article!

Bainbridge Island Gets an Art Museum
(from Seattle Mag)
Bainbridge Island showcases local bounty with a new, eco-friendly museum dedicated to area artists

Executive director Greg Robinson prepares for the June 14 grand opening of BIMA

Creatively focused, eco-obsessed, possessing an urban
sensibility and locavore leanings, beautiful without being braggy—the
new Bainbridge Island Museum of Art (BIMA) might well be considered the
embodiment of the island community itself. And just as the residents
prefer the island’s laidback vibe to Seattle’s comparative bustle, BIMA
supporters and staff have no intention of trying to compete with
mainland art institutions, such as Seattle Art Museum. Instead, the
focus is on contemporary work by artists from the Kitsap and Olympic
peninsulas and the western Puget Sound region.

Founding board member Cynthia Sears, who moved to Bainbridge from Los
Angeles in the late 1980s and first began talking up the idea of
building an art museum there in the early ’90s, says BIMA is perfectly
content with being (as an actor friend of hers put it) “off Broadway.”
“Not just smaller, but more regional,” Sears explains. “Less about big
productions and famous work than about excellence of craft and helping
newcomers get a foot in the door.”

That door, by the way, is made from sustainable FSC-certified wood
(and the foot is likely shod in a Keen athletic sandal). The new
building, which came together thanks to a Bainbridge-based
collaboration—The Island Gateway developers, Coates Design architects
and PHC Construction—and a largely locally funded $15.6 million capital
campaign, is anticipating LEED Gold certification. When that status
becomes official, it will be the first art museum in the state (and one
of only a few nationwide) to achieve such green street cred.

The building is first and foremost inviting, thanks to a striking
curve of tall windows that sweeps visitors toward the entrance. This
translucency is intentional—people inside the museum can see their
community going about its business outside, and people outside can see
visitors going about the gallery within (and thereby feel a vicarious
connection with local art). Indeed, the emphasis of the structure is not
so much on the photovoltaic array, the geothermal heating and cooling
or the low-flow toilets (and waterless urinals!), but on showcasing the
thriving—but largely unsung—regional artist community.

Part of Sears’ initial motivation was the question “If this is such
an ‘artists’ haven’ (as the guide books told me), why wasn’t there a
place where local art was on exhibit for the public?” While
acknowledging the value of art shows at smaller, commercial galleries in
the area, she contends, “A community that cares about art needs an art
museum the same way a community that cares about literacy needs a public
library—no matter how many bookstores might be nearby.”

One of the opening exhibits is of work by Bainbridge Island artist
and children’s book illustrator Barbara Helen Berger, who agrees with
Sears, “Art doesn’t have to be remote.” As for the tone her inaugural
exhibit sets for the museum, she speculates, “My show may convey part of
the museum’s aim: to be inviting and welcoming for everyone, including
children and families.”

Greg Robinson, BIMA’s executive director and curator, points out that
one of the significant local benefits of the museum is serving kids in
the region—for whom taking a field trip to Seattle can be prohibitively
complicated and expensive. “Having an art museum here increases the
accessible and affordable options for schools in the Kitsap area,” he
says. Sears adds that one of the boons of not charging an entrance fee
is that it encourages people of all ages to stop by casually, making the
viewing of art a regular part of everyday life. “I want kids and their
families to feel comfortable just dropping in…to refresh their eyes and
recharge their batteries,” she says.

Port Townsend–based sculptor Margie McDonald also has work in the
first BIMA show, in the commanding Beacon Gallery, an aptly named space
fronted by a two-story bank of windows that faces the ferry terminal and
stands as a guidepost for disembarking passengers. Her “millipede-like”
piece—a 30-foot long underwater scene made with recycled copper, yacht
rigging wire and salmon trolling wire—will hang in the window. “Seattle
is tough for someone like me who doesn’t want to go to the big city very
much,” McDonald says. “I think there’s some excitement here in Port
Townsend that this is ‘our museum.’ BIMA feels like it’s on ‘our side’
of the water.”

Sears believes the regional focus will foster what she calls the “OMG
factor,” meaning the reaction, “OMG, that’s from here?” She hopes that,
as a result, hometown visitors will support “their own” with even more
vigor. “This is our art equivalent to the ‘eat locally’ movement,” she
says.

Robinson is “slowly and deliberately” expanding BIMA’s permanent
collection in line with the goal of being “an incubator and a launching
pad for emerging local artists.” (Sears notes, “We are on record as
having promised our donors that if most of the artists we exhibit have
not achieved national—or world!—recognition in 50 years, we will be
happy to give them their money back.”) But Robinson emphasizes that
rather than dictating a perspective, he and his team are looking to the
artists to reveal what it means to live in the region. “We’re not coming
in as the experts,” he says, “we’re coming in as discoverers. We’re
exploring stories that haven’t been told yet.”

Misinformation & Out of Area Agents

First, Our Experience:
Georg and I utilize Zillow.com, Trulia.com and Realtor.com extensively in marketing our listings. We find that with each of these sites, particularly Zillow.com, we need to continually/daily monitor our listings; making sure that the photos are not duplicated or removed; checking that the marketing remarks clearly explain to the prospective Buyer that they should phone us, or visit our website, to learn more about the property rather than rely on “Premier Buyers Agents” who pay up to $375/month, hoping that the prospective Buyer will contact them about a property and neighborhood they may know little about.
This is very frustrating, and we have considered dropping Zillow.com, BUT we know that the traffic is extremely high there and that prospective Buyers still utilize this site, unaware of the challenges we face in terms of accuracy and knowledge. We do not want to miss any opportunities for our Sellers, so we monitor these sites and on occasion our Sellers do too! We also contact Zillow.com to express our frustration over having out-of-area agents placed next to our Listings as if they are experts on our properties and community.
Lastly, we strongly encourage our Sellers and Buyers to IGNORE valuations from these sites. The only valuations you can trust are from experienced, busy, educated local Brokers who “know the inventory”.
This article from MSN Money tells it all!
Please feel free to share your experience with these sites.

The backlash against Zillow & Co.

Real-estate
agencies are taking a harder look at national aggregators. They say the
websites can be inaccurate, frustrating potential buyers.

It
used to be a given for anyone selling a house that a real-estate agent
would put the listing on national real-estate aggregator websites like Zillow, Trulia and Realtor.com to maximize exposure and sell the home quickly. But that could be changing fast as aggregators and agents face off.

Since
2005 or so, real-estate agents have shared data about homes they have
for sale with those national sites, which have millions of visitors
(Zillow, for example, had 32 million last month). But even though the
sites have grown, sales haven’t in the distressed housing market,
and some agents believe the sites may not be helping. They accuse the
sites of engaging in practices that give buyers inaccurate information
that may hurt sales.

Among their complaints are that the sites
allow any agent, for a fee, to have his or her name and photo appear
prominently beside the homes listed for sale in a given region, even if
the person in picture isn’t the agent representing the seller. In
reality, the agent in the photo may know little about the property or
the neighborhood where the house is located, frustrating customers’
efforts to get accurate answers
, according to a report last year by
real-estate consulting firm Clareity.

Some
agents also claim that many listings on the largest sites are
inaccurate. “The wrong photos often appeared with our listings,” says
San Diego Realtor Jim Abbott, whose firm no longer shares data with the
national sites. He also says that the sites kept up listings that were
no longer on the market. Clareity CEO Gregg Larson says Zillow and
Trulia get information about the same property from multiple sources,
such as the listing agent, the local multiple listing service and
syndication services. “The duplicates sneak through, and then you have
(the same) listing with different prices, listed by different brokers.”

One Massachusetts agent, Jack Attridge, notes in a letter to Inman News
that because homes he’s listed appear on national sites, he’s often
contacted by agents and customers well outside his area who have
questions about those properties. Most of the time, they have incorrect
information, and Attridge wrote that none of those calls has resulted in
a sale.

These
and other problems hurt agents’ reputations and do nothing to sell
houses, they say. Abbott argues that inaccurate Web listings, combined
with side-by-side links to agents who know little about the property,
frustrate potential buyers and may actually drive them to look
elsewhere.

Abbott studied three years of his agency’s sales data
and compared listings that the company didn’t share with national sites
to those it did. “Time after time, the listings that we did syndicate
compared with the listings that we didn’t had no better outcomes,” he
says. “In fact, the ones we didn’t syndicate often sold faster” and
closer to the asking price.

March 15, 2013 Bainbridge Island Market Update

Statistics Year-To-Date, March 15, 2013

Residential Units on the Market: 88 (just above historic lows), down from 100 on February 6th (does not reflect low income
homes at Curtis Ln.). Down from 165 in September.; down from 201 on
March 27th and down from 245 on September 27, 2011. We are just above historic lows with inventory.





Condos
on the Market: 30
. Down from 41 in September. This is the lowest
inventory we have seen in the condo market since early 2000.


Vacant Parcels on the Market: 57. Up from 49 on February 6th, 2013.
Closed Residential Sales Year-to-Date 2013: 55

Closed Residential Sales for Same Period 2011: 41

Homes Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 64

Closed Condo Sales Year-to-Date 2013: 11

Closed Condo Sales for Same Period 2011: 11

Condos Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 15

Sold Vacant Land Year-to-Date: 9
Pending Sale Vacant Land: 7
Sold Vacant Land all of 2005: 69

Residential Sales: 2005 – 2011 – Median Price and Average Days on Market
2012… 386

2011… 257 $493,000 average days on market 155

2010… 255 $540,000 average days on market 132

2009… 212 $546,000 average days on market 198

2008… 186 $589,000 average days on market 161

2007… 331 $680,000 average days on market 98

2006… 350 $673,750 average days on market 98

2005… 397 $650,000 average days on market 91


Breakdown of Residential and Pending Sales Year-to-Date
000 to 100 thousand Sold…0 Pending…0
101 to 200 Sold…6 Pending…0
201 to 300 Sold…6 Pending…8
301 to 400 Sold…12 Pending…14

401 to 500 Sold…8 Pending…18

501 to 600 Sold…10 Pending…10
601 to 700 Sold…6 Pending…9
701 to 800 Sold…4 Pending…4
801 to 900 Sold…1 Pending…6

901 to 1Mil Sold…1 Pending…2

1.0 to 1.2Mil Sold…1 Pending…0

1.2 to 1.4Mil Sold…2 Pending…2

1.4 to 1.6Mil Sold…0 Pending…0

1.6 to 1.8Mil Sold…0 Pending…1

1.8 to 2.0Mil Sold…0 Pending…1


2.0 to 2.5Mil Sold…1 Pending…0








2.5 Million + Sold…0 Pending…0



Bainbridge Island Market Statistics As of February 6, 2013

Statistics Year-To-Date, February 6, 2013

Residential Units on the Market: 100 (does not reflect low income
homes at Curtis Ln.). Down from 165 in September.; down from 201 on
March 27th and down from 245 on September 27, 2011. We are close to historic lows.

Condos
on the Market: 30. Down from 41 in September. This is the lowest
inventory we have seen in the condo market since early 2000.

Vacant Parcels on the Market: 49.
Closed Residential Sales Year-to-Date 2013: 19

Closed Residential Sales for Same Period 2011: 14

Homes Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 54

Closed Condo Sales Year-to-Date 2012: 5

Closed Condo Sales for Same Period 2011: 4

Condos Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 13

Sold Vacant Land Year-to-Date: 3
Pending Sale Vacant Land: 4
Sold Vacant Land all of 2005: 69

Residential Sales: 2005 – 2011 – Median Price and Average Days on Market
2012… 386

2011… 257 $493,000 average days on market 155

2010… 255 $540,000 average days on market 132

2009… 212 $546,000 average days on market 198

2008… 186 $589,000 average days on market 161

2007… 331 $680,000 average days on market 98

2006… 350 $673,750 average days on market 98

2005… 397 $650,000 average days on market 91


Breakdown of Residential and Pending Sales Year-to-Date
000 to 100 thousand Sold…0 Pending…0
101 to 200 Sold…1 Pending…0
201 to 300 Sold…3 Pending…4
301 to 400 Sold…6 Pending…11

401 to 500 Sold…3 Pending…12

501 to 600 Sold…6 Pending…7
601 to 700 Sold…2 Pending…3
701 to 800 Sold…1 Pending…2
801 to 900 Sold…0 Pending…3

901 to 1Mil Sold…0 Pending…3

1.0 to 1.2Mil Sold…1 Pending…0

1.2 to 1.4Mil Sold…1 Pending…0

1.4 to 1.6Mil Sold…0 Pending…0

1.6 to 1.8Mil Sold…0 Pending…0

1.8 to 2.0Mil Sold…0 Pending…0


2.0 to 2.5Mil Sold…0 Pending…0




2.5 Million + Sold…0 Pending…0

Average Sales Price Chart Type:

Average Sale Price300,000410,000520,000630,000Jan 2013Dec 2012Nov 2012Oct 2012Sep 2012Aug 2012Jun 2012
Total Sales Chart Type:



2012 Bainbridge Island Market Wrap!

Enter Here for a complete overview of the Bainbridge Island Real Estate Market

Statistics as of December 30, 2012. Market Wrap for 2012.


Residential Units on the Market (as of Jan 9, 2013): 93 (does not reflect 6 low income
homes at Curtis Ln.). Down from 165 in September.; down from 201 on
March 27th and down from 245 on September 27, 2011. We are only a few homes above historic lows for Bainbridge residential inventory.

Condos
on the Market (as of Jan 9, 2013): 20. Down from 41 in September. This is the lowest
inventory we have seen in the condo market since early 2000.

Vacant Parcels on the Market: 46. Down by 14 since September.
Closed Residential Sales for all of 2012: 384

Closed Residential Sales for Same Period 2011: 257 A 50% Increase in Sales over 2011.

Homes Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 51

Closed Condo Sales for 2012: 80

Closed Condo Sales for 2011: 67 A 20% Increase in Sales over 2011

Condos Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 10

Sold Vacant Land Year-to-Date: 31
Pending Sale Vacant Land: 10
Sold Vacant Land all of 2005: 69

Residential Sales: 2005 – 2012 – Median Price and Average Days on Market
2012… 384

2011… 257 $493,000 average days on market 155

2010… 255 $540,000 average days on market 132

2009… 212 $546,000 average days on market 198

2008… 186 $589,000 average days on market 161

2007… 331 $680,000 average days on market 98

2006… 350 $673,750 average days on market 98

2005… 397 $650,000 average days on market 91

Breakdown of Residential Sales for 2012
000 to 100 thousand Sold…0
101 to 200 Sold…12
201 to 300 Sold…40
301 to 400 Sold…55

401 to 500 Sold…67

501 to 600 Sold…56
601 to 700 Sold…42
701 to 800 Sold…21
801 to 900 Sold…25

901 to 1Mil Sold…9

1.0 to 1.2Mil Sold…17

1.2 to 1.4Mil Sold…16

1.4 to 1.6Mil Sold…3

1.6 to 1.8Mil Sold…3

1.8 to 2.0Mil Sold…3


2.0 to 2.5Mil Sold…6


2.5 Million + Sold…2

Avg. Sale Price Median Sale Price Max Sale Price Min Sale Price Sales Volume Total Sales Avg. Price SqFt Sale % of List Price Avg. Days on Market Month
$458,475 $375,000 $2,147,500 $100,000 $18,797,511 41 $226 96% 144 Dec 2012
$546,413 $425,000 $1,649,000 $136,000 $15,299,584 28 $217 97.3% 149 Nov 2012
$614,544 $498,250 $2,195,000 $102,500 $29,498,150 48 $235 96.8% 138 Oct 2012
$483,321 $395,000 $1,365,000 $81,000 $16,916,251 35 $221 96.9% 97 Sep 2012
$582,672 $495,000 $2,200,000 $170,000 $32,047,000 55 $244 95.2% 167 Aug 2012
$584,928 $538,500 $2,100,000 $206,000 $31,001,200 53 $250 97% 116 Jul 2012
$515,220 $440,000 $1,200,000 $145,000 $12,880,500 25 $227 97.2% 123 Jun 2012
Average Sales Price Chart Type:

Average Sale Price450,000500,000550,000600,000Dec 2012Nov 2012Oct 2012Sep 2012Aug 2012Jul 2012Jun 2012


Local Fun for the Holidays, by Georg Syvertsen

Northwest Weather and Adventure



We often meet with prospective buyers from out of state, they ask about the weather. We let them know the weather forecasters usually are accurate a day out, maybe two J. We get our fair share of sun and also rain, and every day is a surprise. But one fascinating thing about our area is you can drive 1.5 hours from Seattle east and you’re in a semi-arid climate, and there is lots of sunshine. There is so much to see and explore east of the mountains and it’s so close, no excuse for those who need a sunshine fix. Camping is great, lake fishing, exploring the wine country and the various little lost and forgotten towns packed with hidden treasure. So don’t fret, there is lots of sunshine to be had and many places to explore! Enter here to learn more about Eastern Washington in the Winter.


Holiday Fun



For many of us there is a little known event that takes place in downtown Bellevue, (SNOW FLAKE LANE) just 15 minutes from downtown Seattle by car or you can take the express bus right up the street from the ferry. The intersection of Lincoln Square turns into onc huge Holiday Party at 7:00 PM every night through December 31st. Drummer boys and girls are playing holiday songs; Santa’s helpers are everywhere, reindeer, the snow princess and prince; snow men, dancing polar bears and penguins, snow falling, and much more. Once you’ve visited this event, you’ll go back again like we did and maybe even spend the night at a hotel and do some shopping or catch a movie at the Cineplex. A must see for one and all! ENTER HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION!

Why It is the Right Time to Place Your Home on the Market

People believe “Spring
Flowers” mean more home sales. In part this is true, but is there an advantage to placing your home up for sale now?

The fact is more
sales do occur in the spring and summer but there are also far more homes for
sale, making for tougher competition. The
ratio of sales-to-inventory (see the stats with current inventory in our Blog/Market Update. Currently we are seeing residential inventory close to historic lows!) in the winter months often favor home owners who
place homes on the market now, as Sellers pull homes off the market for the
holidays and others wait for the traditional buying season in spring. Plus, the majority of Buyers this time
of year are serious, versus those visiting our Island in warmer months; viewing
homes with the idea, “maybe someday we’ll move here”.

This time of
year allows Sellers the advantage of promoting their homes during festive
holidays: Thanksgiving, Hanukah and Christmas. Buyers envision themselves
living in a home with a warm, celebratory atmosphere.

Naturally our
economy has to be taken into consideration. The stock market, national/global
economic news and world events affect what we can afford and when we will make
our move. And while we are only just seeing the beginnings of a local real estate recovery, we should remember that
interest rates were double digits not that long ago and they won’t stay this
low forever. Buyers are savvy to our market; they are paying attention to
interest rates and our current inventory. Regardless the time of year, they are
ready to write an offer on your home, but they can’t if you are waiting, like
everyone else, for Spring!

Bainbridge Island Real Estate Statistics as of November 20, 2012


Statistics Year-To-Date


Residential Units on the Market: 128 (does not reflect 7 low income homes at Curtis Ln.). Down from 165 in September.; down from 201 on March 27th and down from 245 on September 27, 2011. We are seeing much lower inventory than usual for this time of year.

Condos on the Market: 30. Down from 41 in September. This is the lowest inventory we have seen in the condo market since early 2000.

Vacant Parcels on the Market: 56. No change since September.
Closed Residential Sales Year-to-Date 2012: 344

Closed Residential Sales for Same Period 2011: 229 A 50% Increase in Sales over last year.

Homes Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 65

Closed Condo Sales Year-to-Date 2012: 68

Closed Condo Sales for Same Period 2011: 60

Condos Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 14

Sold Vacant Land Year-to-Date: 28
Pending Sale Vacant Land: 10
Sold Vacant Land all of 2005: 69

Residential Sales: 2005 – 2011 – Median Price and Average Days on Market
2011… 257 $493,000 average days on market 155

2010… 255 $540,000 average days on market 132

2009… 212 $546,000 average days on market 198

2008… 186 $589,000 average days on market 161

2007… 331 $680,000 average days on market 98

2006… 350 $673,750 average days on market 98

2005… 397 $650,000 average days on market 91

Breakdown of Residential and Pending Sales Year-to-Date
000 to 100 thousand Sold…0 Pending…0
101 to 200 Sold…9 Pending…5
201 to 300 Sold…32 Pending…15
301 to 400 Sold…55 Pending…12

401 to 500 Sold…62 Pending…9

501 to 600 Sold…49 Pending…13
601 to 700 Sold…40 Pending…1
701 to 800 Sold…19 Pending…3
801 to 900 Sold…21 Pending…5

901 to 1Mil Sold…9 Pending…0

1.0 to 1.2Mil Sold…16 Pending…1

1.2 to 1.4Mil Sold…16 Pending…1

1.4 to 1.6Mil Sold…3 Pending…0

1.6 to 1.8Mil Sold…3 Pending…0

1.8 to 2.0Mil Sold…3 Pending…0


2.0 to 2.5Mil Sold…5 Pending…1

2.5 Million + Sold…3 Pending…0

Bainbridge Island

Single Family Homes


Bainbridge Island Real Estate Stats as of September 21, 2012


Statistics Year-To-Date

Residential Units on the Market: 165. Down from 201 on March 27th and down from 245 on September 27, 2011. We are seeing much lower inventory than usual for this time of year.

Condos on the Market: 41 Inventory has been holding steady with no major movement.

Vacant Parcels on the Market: 57
Closed Residential Sales Year-to-Date 2012: 287

Closed Residential Sales for Same Period 2011: 188 A 52% Increase in Sales over last year.

Homes Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 62

Closed Condo Sales Year-to-Date 2012: 53

Closed Condo Sales for Same Period 2011: 49

Condos Currently Under Contract (Pending Sale): 15

Sold Vacant Land Year-to-Date: 23
Pending Sale Vacant Land: 13
Sold Vacant Land all of 2005: 69

Residential Sales: 2005 – 2011 – Median Price and Average Days on Market
2011… 257 $493,000 average days on market 155

2010… 255 $540,000 average days on market 132

2009… 212 $546,000 average days on market 198

2008… 186 $589,000 average days on market 161

2007… 331 $680,000 average days on market 98

2006… 350 $673,750 average days on market 98

2005… 397 $650,000 average days on market 91

Breakdown of Residential and Pending Sales Year-to-Date
000 to 100 thousand Sold…2 Pending…1
101 to 200 Sold…11 Pending…11
201 to 300 Sold…46 Pending…12
301 to 400 Sold…67 Pending…17

401 to 500 Sold…55 Pending…12

501 to 600 Sold…46 Pending…9
601 to 700 Sold…35 Pending…4
701 to 800 Sold…14 Pending…5
801 to 900 Sold…16 Pending…6

901 to 1Mil Sold…8 Pending…4

1.0 to 1.2Mil Sold…15 Pending…4

1.2 to 1.4Mil Sold…14 Pending…2

1.4 to 1.6Mil Sold…1 Pending…1

1.6 to 1.8Mil Sold…1 Pending…3

1.8 to 2.0Mil Sold…3 Pending…0


2.0 to 2.5Mil Sold…4 Pending…2
2.5 Million + Sold…2 Pending…1